Firefox 27 Bug Statistics

I’m writing today to present the bug statistics for Firefox 27. My apologies for the tardiness of this blog post; too many things have got in my way recently. I try to get these posts out at the end of life of the respective Firefox version as that allows me to present the statistics across the entire life-cycle of a Firefox version. For Firefox 27, this should have coincided with Firefox 28’s release a few weeks ago. Again, my apologies for getting this out later than usual.

The first story I want to tell is about the high-level breakdown of all tracked bug in this release. As you can see below there was a marked drop in the total bug volume in Firefox 27. Perhaps unsurprisingly this allowed us to focus a bit more which resulted in a smaller amount of unresolved and unconfirmed bugs being shipped in this release. The numbers are still much higher than we would like but it is a small victory for the overall quality of Firefox if these numbers continue to trend downward.

Firefox27_TotalBugs

The second story I want to tell is about the percentage of incoming bugs confirmed. This is typically an indication of the effectiveness of our incoming bug triage practices. As the volume of incoming bugs decreases we like to see the number of confirmed bugs increase. Unfortunately we have been trending the opposite direction for some time. Previously I had attributed this to the ever increasing volume of bugs but I can no longer rely on this excuse. Looking forward to Firefox 28 I can say that we’ve made remarkable improvement in this area in an effort to reverse this trend. I’ll share more on that in a few weeks.

Firefox27_Confirmed

The third story I’d like to share is that of when fixes landed for Firefox 27. The following chart I’ve plotted the average time-line for the past few releases along with Firefox 27’s time-line. In general we expect to see an ever increasing curve toward through the Nightly cycle, trailing off as we proceed through Aurora and Beta, with spikes in the first half of these cycles.

Firefox 27 appeared to be trending higher than average as we approached the end of each cycle. While these numbers are not completely out of control it does put a bit of extra strain on QA. After all, the later a fix lands, the less time we have to test it. Ultimately this creates risk to the quality of the product we ship, but as long as we recognize that we can try to plan for it accordingly.

Firefox27_Fixes-by-Date

The fourth story I want to tell is about the number of bugs reopened. We typically reopen a bug when something is fundamentally flawed with the initial implementation and/or if a patch needs to be backed out. Even in cases where a regression is found, we tend to leave the bug closed and deal with the regression in its own bug report. As such, a high volume of bugs being reopened is usually indicative of a release that saw much churn and may point to quality issues in release.

Unfortunately Firefox 27 continues the story of many of the version before it and represents a marginal increase in the number of bugs reopened. Of course, the other side of this story may be that testing was more effective. It’s hard to say concretely just looking at the bug numbers.

Firefox27_Reopened

The fifth story I want to tell is one of stability. The following chart shows the number of topcrash bugs reported against Firefox 27 as compared to previous releases. For those unaware, a topcrash bug are those crashes which show up most frequently in the wild and present the greatest risk to quality and security for our users. The unfortunate story for Firefox 27 is that we’ve seen an end to the downward trend that we saw started with Firefox 25 and continued with Firefox 26. The volume of topcrashes puts Firefox 27 in the same ballpark as the rash of point-releases we saw in Firefox’s teens.

Of course there’s two sides to every story. The other side of this may very well be that we got better at reporting stability issues and that resulted in a higher volume of known bugs. It’s hard to say for sure.

Firefox27_Topcrashes

The final story I want to tell today is about the percentage of regressions reported post-release. As we hone our processes, bring on more engineers, and get assistance from more contributors, we’ve been getting better at finding and fixing regressions. It’s inevitable that the more code landing in a release increases the potential for regression. Naturally this leads to an increase in the total number of regressions reported. Firefox 27 was no different so I thought I’d look at regressions a little differently this time around.

The following chart shows the ratio of regressions reported before release to regressions reported after release. A release with a high-volume of post-release regressions is a failure from a QA perspective because it means many bugs slipping through our fingers. I wouldn’t expect the number of post-release regressions to ever be 0 but we need to strive to always be better.

Firefox 27 represents a huge victory on this front. We saw a huge drop in the number of Firefox 27 regressions reported post-release. For months we’ve sought to improve our triage processes, engage more with developers, and work harder to involve volunteers in our day to day efforts. It’s nice to see these efforts finally paying off.

Firefox27_Regressions

That’s Firefox 27, in a nutshell, from a QA perspective. I think it’s useful to be able to reflect on the bug numbers and see what kind of an impact our efforts are having on the product. I really do enjoy visualizing the data and talking about our “victories”, but it’s just as interesting seeing what the data is telling us about where we may have failed. I believe that learning from failures has far more impact than building on successes and acts as a great motivator. What we want to avoid is those crippling failures. I think Firefox 27 is a nice iterative step forward.

2 thoughts on “Firefox 27 Bug Statistics”

  1. How can unresolved or unconfirmed bugs “be shipped”? I understand things as shipping only when the bug was fixed, and that doesn’t fit with those categories, at least in my small head…

    1. Robert, thank you for the comment. I’m using the term “ship” to mean a bug that potentially exists in a shipped product, not that it was fixed.

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